Monday, March 7, 2011

Justice Madan - "Father of the famous Madans"

We are all proud of our Madans -- Kamla, Sheila, Veena, and Anil. Here is an article on their famous father.

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PERSONAL REFLECTION ON OUR FATHER JUSTICE MADAN



By KAMLA MADAN DHALL and ANIL MADAN





Will those who remember him recall the larger-than-life personality with the engaging smile that would light up a room or his simple but profound legal pronouncements including the one in the Githunguri case, a ruling that lit up a nation? Long before he was appointed a judge and long before he became Chief Justice, he was always known as “Chief.” An easy and unambiguous recognition by all that he was the leader and an easy acceptance – no arrogance there, just a smile – of the role on his part.



The disarming smile and helping hand for all, behind a spine of steel, unbending on matters of principle, sum up this gentle, kind and tough man. His outreach to young lawyers, a genuine interest in their success, a ready willingness to write letters of recommendation, his easy recall of everyone’s name, and never being too important or too busy to spend a moment with anyone and everyone, these are the fond memories we and others have.



He studied at Middle Temple in London and was the youngest to become a barrister at that hallowed institution. He was very proud of having eaten dinners at Middle Temple. Kamla: He was equally proud of me for having followed in his footsteps. Anil: When I graduated from Harvard Law School, he said “Well, Harvard is nice, but don’t you want to be a real barrister? I’ve enrolled you at Middle Temple.” I spoke with one of the Deans at HLS who said “Why guild the lily?” I think Dad was disappointed.



Dad loved Kenya. He loved it as his home, his country, his special charge to preserve and protect. He wrote the song Mother Kenya. He had no other loyalty. I remember being at Uhuru Stadium on December 12, 1963 (I got my Mother’s seat on the dais behind President Kenyatta and the Ministers and judges, as she was indisposed). He was truly happy that his beloved Kenya was no longer a colony.



His love of Kenya was for the country and its people, its animals, its magnificent topography. He absolutely loved to go “on safari” and took us as kids all over Kenya to the coast, to the game parks, to the mountains, to the desert areas, all over Kenya: from Kericho, Kisumu, Kakamega, Eldoret, to Marsabit, Isiolo, Garbatula, Meru, Garissa, Malindi, Mombasa, Lamu, and places along the way, Voi, Makindu, Mtito Andei, Nyeri, Nanyuki, Nakuru, Narok, you name it. We were privileged. Getting ready to go on safari was a ritual. He would fill up about ten empty Johnnie Walker bottles with water and the case of twelve would have two slots for full bottles of the real stuff. Tins of condensed milk, butter, spices, onions, potatoes, baked beans, and other staples for use when we stopped to eat, and we were off.



Once on the road, he would be as excited as a little boy to point out a herd of elephants or giraffes or baboons, and would call out the names of other animals: Tommies (Thompson’s gazelles) Elands, Wildebeeste and so forth. He abhorred poachers and said they would ruin the greatest natural resource any country on earth has.



He had other rituals too. What comes to mind is his evening whiskey and soda, no ice, if you please. Not abstemious, but careful, he would pour about a half-inch of Johnnie Walker, sometimes, about three-quarters of an inch and top it off with soda which, of course, meant club soda. He never drank after dinner. On Saturday afternoons he would have one or two beers and often while he was peeling shrimp or preparing Kingfish to cook for lunch. He loved to cook – it was a release. Anil: As a little boy, I would go to his office on Government Road. I remember watching the procession from the second-story window of his office when Princess Elizabeth visited Kenya in 1952 and of later seeing the flag masts cut down when her father King George VI died. It was a dramatic contrast to the pomp and ceremony before. He would take me to stores along Government Road – Beliram Parimal was his favorite because they not only had his Johnnie Walker, but also sold stinky cheeses. How he loved blue cheese and Roquefort!



Every Friday for many years, he would have lunch with his friend Rashid at the Rashid Garage. They would cook chicken with chana dal and tell jokes and recite poetry. What made him different was that he was equally at ease with Rashid as with Presidents and Prime Ministers – we had a few visit our home, among them President Nyerere and Prime Minister Ramgoolam. The man who ran the samosa shop, or Savani’s paan shop or the Gujerati businessman who had a small tailoring shop, he seemed just as happy to see them. They would invite him in and he never refused, and would readily sit down and accept a cup of tea.



As a lawyer and Minister, he wore custom-tailored suits and shirts with detachable starched collars which went to Kushal Singh Laundry. He was fastidious about his dress and having his shoes polished. But he was humble and graceful about it. One day, we were in the outdoor vegetable market on a Saturday jaunt to get vegetables to augment the shrimp. A man who worked as an accountant in the Railway office happened by. He expressed great surprise that “Chief” was actually shopping in the vegetable market. “Chief, you in a place like this? What are you doing here with us ordinary people?” Dad looked at him, smiled, put a hand on his shoulder and said, “When it comes to eating, I am just as ordinary as you.”



And speaking of the railway, he just loved to put his car on the train at Nairobi station and go overnight to Mombasa. As a judge on circuit, he relished that trip.



So what made him tick? Whence did this strength and moral fiber emanate? It started with the unshakable belief and practice that truth was most important above all else. He never lied. This did not come from religion for he was not observant of any particular faith. But he was welcomed in temples, mosques, gurudwaras and churches because he gave no offense to any. He would often say Truth is the only religion you need. That is the way he lived.



Somewhere inside him, was a fairness meter. He simply hated unfairness and hypocrisy. When he was a Minister in the Kenya government, he traveled to the US, Ghana, Nigeria, and South Africa. I asked him about South Africa and he told me that Apartheid was an evil that would not endure. What about his experience when he visited, I asked. He said “They pretended I was white and let me in to the best hotel. So, it’s not something they believe in, it’s just exploitation.” For years afterward, the hotel dutifully sent him a Christmas card every December. I used to smile whenever I saw it come in.



The strong abhorrence for discrimination showed in other ways. In the 1950s he often talked about how British rule would end and must end in Kenya. He told a story about when he was running for election in 1948, or perhaps in the 1950s. He was in Thika to visit a group of mostly Gujerati businessmen and professionals on a campaign stop. He told them that change was coming and Kenya would soon be independent. They should take Africans as partners to prepare for the transition. About fifteen years too early, he was prescient about injustice not being able to stand. He said they virtually laughed him out of the room.



In the 1950s there was an ice-cream store in Nairobi that served only whites and boldly proclaimed so with a sign. As a Minister in the Kenya Government, he could not abide this. He went to the ice-cream parlor with an entourage and demanded service. Since he was a Minister, they did serve him. He bought ice-cream for the group and, at his instance, they all threw it on the street –refusing to eat ice-cream flavored with the taint of racism. The owner called the police who refused to take action against Dad, most likely because he was a Minister.



Anil: I happened to be at home when the call came from the Governor that the Queen had appointed him a Puisne Judge. I was too young to understand the significance of a judicial appointment, but Dad seemed genuinely overwhelmed and pleased. My mother and he had a special friendship, married a long, long time and able to talk to each other in complete confidence. They seemed to be sharing a special moment of happiness then. Shortly after, they

left to visit an old friend to break the news personally – the next day, I learned it was Rashid.



When Dad returned home later that evening, he got busy frantically calling various people I recognized as well-known members of the Indian community. This was not to pat himself on the back but to express grave concern that the appointment had come on the eve of the day for submitting nominations for the Legislative Council elections. He would no longer be the unopposed candidate in view of his appointment to the bench. He expressed frustration that the appointment had been announced at a time so critical to the nomination deadline and allowed as how the timing was deliberate. “They know that I couldn’t turn this down and it will disrupt the elections.”



He enjoyed being a judge. The scholarship came to him naturally. As a young boy, he had been sent by his parents to the Punjab to study Urdu. He was as facile at turning a phrase in Urdu as in English, and loved Urdu and Farsi poetry which he had read extensively.



As a judge he had abiding sense of responsibility. “Justice delayed is justice denied,” he often said repeating that well-worn phrase. Except in his case, he did something about it. He wrote his judgments promptly and insisted that other judges also do so.



Anil: Often, I would discuss his cases with him. Before I came to the US for college and ultimately law school, I would help type his decisions which he invariably wrote in the evenings with his tall glass of whiskey-soda beside him. One case in particular I remember involved a head-on collision on the Nairobi-Mombasa road. He decreed that both drivers were equally responsible. This was my first awareness of the doctrine of contributory or comparative negligence. I questioned him about this decision which now seems Solomonic, and he told me that his job was not to protect insurance companies with technicalities but to do substantial justice. If both insurers escaped responsibility, they would have collected premiums without fulfilling their obligation to indemnify for losses. This revealed his strong sense of social justice. Some might call him an activist judge, but he would shrug off labels and say that his job was to do the right thing.



After I graduated from law school, he often asked me about American case law and I recall in one instance faxing hundreds of pages of materials to him in Nairobi. This was before the days of email. His willingness to look outside familiar law books reflected his curiosity, scholarship, and straining to do the right thing.



Perhaps he will be most remembered for his ruling in the Githunguri case. There, as a matter of Constitutional interpretation, he ruled that the Court was empowered to issue a prohibitory order barring the Attorney-General from initiating a prosecution where there had been delay in prosecution, public assurances that no prosecution would ensue and where the prosecution may be deemed abusive or vexatious. Moreover, the court could enjoin a Magistrate from conducting proceedings in such a case, if filed.



There were thunderous cheers when he delivered his ruling in the Githunguri matter. Later that day, when he arrived home, he told our mother “Today, I have cooked my own goose, but it was the right thing to do and I have done the right thing.” Our mother simply said, “If you have done the right thing, you did what you are supposed to do.”



His comment to our mother tells us that he was not oblivious to the consequences of his actions in the real world of politics. It was his hope that he would inspire reverence for the rule of law and the Constitution, for as he warned, if you cause the people to lose confidence by weakening the Constitution, you have lost the nation.



On a related note, he talked with me about freedom of expression. It’s not the President who cares about criticism, he said, but the underlings who think it is their job to protect the President. One day a President will understand that letting people express criticism is the way to stability. It’s better than letting their frustrations get pent up. The country will be better off for it.



The scuttlebutt is that President Moi fired him from his position as Chief Justice. It was not just Githunguri, but he had refused to sanction, as some may recall, special courts as demanded by then Attorney-General Muli. There was one judiciary under the Constitution and that would have to be good enough, he said. There would be no special courts not answerable to the judiciary.



The truth is that he had reached the Constitutional retirement age. Nevertheless, he did tell me that if the President wanted him to stay, he would have. But he added that he wouldn’t ask for something that was a violation of the Constitution.



Years later, when that spine of steel had succumbed to cancer which was the only thing that could bend it, he was in his hospital bed. President Moi came to his bedside, a gracious gesture. The President said he was sorry to see Dad ill and said, “You have served your country well and the nation is grateful.” You could feel the respect emanating from President Moi.

Monday, February 14, 2011

LOVEDALE RATNA -- Mr. D.S.Babu -- R.I.P



All our GREAT TEACHERS. Mr. D.S. Babu (5th Row -- Left Most)

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From Mr. Iyengar:

Dear Venu,

Is it posible to send the tel nos or the emails of CM!s daughters or MMS. I have

sent my condolences through Jani
.


DSBabu passedaway twelth Octr 2010.



M.S.Iyengar
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sorry to hear that Mr DS Babu is no more.....may his soul rest in
peace....

Partha Nil 61

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I am deeply saddened by the news of the passing away of dear Mr D S Babu. He touched each and every person he came into contact with.

May his soul rest in eternal peace.

Dr K K Chandran
Sumeru56

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This is very sad news.
May Mr Babu's soul rest in peace.
He was a real gentleman; one of the new breed of teachers who joined as a result of KIT's 'Winter Massacre', when a whole lot of old teachers were replaced by a better set of young blood.
In grief
Kevin Phillips
Aravalli 1956

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It was Spring of 1956. My first few weeks in school. We were 6th graders. Every morning, we gathered in a class room that was next to the Physics Lab. There was a passway between the lab and our class room. The windows in the class looked over at the quadrangle (then Nilgiri and Aravalli quadrangle). Our class teacher was Mr. D. S. Babu, a real angel without wings.

Our class consisted of some of the most beautiful girls who you could see in the world. Atleast that's what I think even to this day. To name a few -- Nomita, Indra, Ava, ... These young ladies would only choose to be naughty in Mr. Babu's class. You would frequently hear Mr. Babu call out their names. And the ladies good naturedly smiled and went about inventing new ways to be naughty. And, how about my friend Shivanna, he got lots of attention from Mr. Babu. Oh, how much I desired to be naughty. Two things held me back -- my timid nature and I couldn't then speak a sentence in English. I wish I had the skills to say "Make my day Sir," even though it sounds so stupid. Mr. Babu would probably have called me out saying "Kattabomman" -- because that's how he used to tease me.

Mr. Babu was one of my favorite teachers. I was home sick during first few weeks at school. But I always looked forward to Mr. Babu's class -- that's one place I didn't feel lonely.

Thank you sir!! Good Bye Mr.Chips, Oops sorry, Good Bye Mr. Babu -- you will always live in our hearts.


Krish
Vindhya 61

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

Remembering Winston Prince R.I.P



Picture taken in the Summer-Fall 2010 in Hong Kong.



when he was in Lovedale



when he was in his mid-twenties with his parents



Winston Prince



PRINCE, Winston, Victor Arthur September 4, 1953 - January 2, 2011


It is with sorrow that the family announces the loss of Winston who passed away in Hong Kong's Queen Mary Hospital with his son, Kyle, by his side. The family would like to thank the hospital staff for their efforts to arrest the cancer that overwhelmed him. We would also like to thank his colleagues at the Evaluation and Assessment Authority for the kindness and generosity shown to family members. A memorial service was held at his workplace. We know that those who were touched by his humour and warmth will miss him, as we will. Born in Lovedale, India, he grew up in Montreal from the age of 14. He attended Rosemount high school in Montreal, and later obtained a teacher's certificate from McGill University. He taught high school in Cobourg and Dryden, Ontario, before teaching English in Dubai, UAE. In 1997, he moved to Hong Kong where he remained. He is survived by his wife, Chantal; his son, Kyle; mother Magdalen; brothers, Christopher, Denzil, Bobby; sisters Dorothy and Joan, and nieces and nephews. A private family service will be held in the summer.



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Dear Denzil,

My heartfelt condolences to you and to the entire extended Prince family.

I'm copying David Samson, s/o late Vice Admiral B.A. Samson. David is an OL (Aravalli-1972) based in Lantau, Hong Kong; and I'm sure that he will help in any way possible if you contact him. His mobile no. is 852-9183-4487.

I was with David in Hong Kong in April and in June 2010, and we had absolutely no idea that Winston was in HK.

In grief,

Jasbir S. Randhawa
(Aravalli-1970)


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Dear Denzil,
Sorry to hear about the sad demise of Winston Prince.
May his Soul rest in peace. May the Most High give you the strength to bear the great loss!
Venu.
(Dr.K.V.Venugopal, Aravalli 1955)

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It is really sad indeed. I knew Winston and Christopher as very small kids when I passed out from school in 1964. As they were quite junior to me, my interaction with them was limited. Mrs M Prince was my class teacher (Class V) in 1959. I never knew her first name (Magdalen)till today. I vividly remember her classes. It is
unfortunate that he has passed away at this young age. I pray for his soul to rest in peace. The Lord Almighty should give his near and dear ones courage to bear the great loss.

V Sethuraman
Ex VIN 1956-64


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Can't tell you how saddened I am to hear the news.
I had a few wonderful times with Winston during our early days in Montreal.
I was at his first wedding.
Remember an all-nighter at 'Thursdays' downtown Montreal and many visits
to the motel he ran on St. Jacques St. And of course his visits to my house.
I had wanted to meet him in Hong Kong on a visit that did not happen yet.
My sincere condolences to all his family .

Sydney

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Kevin & others ,

Winston was from my batch -- 69. I think he was in Nilgiri house & left school earlier than the rest of us after or in the middle of class 10. In our days there were only 11 classes --senior cambridge(ISC).

I remember Winston was a likeable good guy-- a musician like Denzil --his brother.

May his soul reat in peace.

Nirmal - where have you popped up from out of the blue --a pleasant surprise.Which spaceship are you on ??!!

Anil V Menon -69

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Winnie was a member of our day-scholar gang, I remember playing with him and Christopher during school hols when all the boarders went home and we day-scholars had the whole school campus to ourselves. Nice guy.

Vinod Vyas

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Hi


Winston and I studied violin together taught by his mother. I also remember the crazy experiments we did with his Dad. I tried to track him down and was told that he is in Hong Kong but never followed up on it, I guess it is too late now! It is quite disconcerting to hear about your classmates passing away, it certainly a wake up call "to make the best of what we yet may spend."


To live in the hearts of those we leave behind is not to die.


Ben


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Denzil

Please accept my deepest condolences on the demise of Winston. Please convey my condolences to the rest of your family.

Regards
Jacob Chacko
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Hello Krish

Thank you for posting the pictures of Winston and for the memorial.

I had e-mailed Kevin and Nick regarding the details surrounding Winston's death. While Dorothy had provided some detail, I would like to make a few corrections.


Winston admitted himself to the Queen Mary Hospital in early December 2010, due to a persistent cough and shortness of breath. It was believed that he was suffering from lymphoma, but lab tests proved negative. He improved somewhat and was able to leave hospital for Christmas. However, he was readmitted on the 26th and a diagnosis of carcinoma of the lung was confirmed. Christopher received a call from Winston's 20 y/o son, Kyle, in Vancouver on December 31, 2010. Apparently, Winston's health was deteriorating and the attending physicians were recommending that family be present. Kyle left that afternoon and was able to see his father a few hours before his death. Kyle was allowed to remain in Winston’s room through the night and they were able to spend time together (albeit all too brief). Kyle reassured him that his mother (Magdalen) and brother (Chris) were on their way. At about 1 AM, Winston’s heart rate began to drop steadily. It did not respond to attempts by medical staff at Queen Mary’s to alter its resolute course. A morphine drip was started and at approximately 2 AM January 2, 2011, Winston died sleeping painlessly and peacefully. He was 57 years old. The cause of death was attributed to carcinoma of the lungs. Magdalen and Christopher caught the first direct flight to Hong Kong from Toronto which was on January 1. They arrived in Hong Kong on January 2 at 3 PM. Kyle informed them of the sad news. They had arrived 13 hours too late.

Winston's untimely (and all too early) death came as a shock to his colleagues at Evaluation and Assessment Authority in Hong Kong as he had spoken to his manager a week earlier and indicated that he expected to be at work in the New Year. His colleagues held a memorial service for him. Winston was cremated and his ashes returned with Magdalen and Christopher to Canada. The family plans to have a memorial service for him this summer when his ashes will be spread over his father's grave (Victor) in Montreal.

I know that those who were touched by his humour and warmth will miss him, as will we.

Feel free to edit as you see fit.

Thanks again

Sincerely,

Chris

Christopher R. Prince, Ph.D., C. Psych.

Practice in Clinical Psychology and Clinical Neuropsychology

Sunday, January 30, 2011

Remembering K. Elango R.I.P.‏



The photograph of Mr. Elango (courtesy Beena Belliappa, nee Elizabeth Tharakan-Deodar 1970) was taken at Bangalore in March 2010, during a get-together of the Class of 1970 Bangalore Chapter. The other person, behind Mr. Elango in the photograph is Nirmal Iyengar (Nilgiri-1970).





Elango with Indira Gandhi. Elango is the little kid sitting 2nd from Right. The two Staff Members are Mr. T.R. Vaidyanathan and Mr. M. Mukherjee.





Elango on top.
Photograph of Gymnastics during the PT Display at Founders 1970, Elango is the kid right on top.

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I am extremely sorry to inform you all that my former classmate, K. Elango (Kunasekaran Elango) - Aravalli 1970, passed away at about 7.30 p.m. on Sunday, 30th January 2011 at his home in Bangalore, after an apparent heart attack. Elango had a pacemaker installed some time ago, and was due for an Angio tomorrow. He was alone at home at the time, as his wife was away at Madurai. He was 56 years old.

Elango is survived by his wife, Meena, son - Villavan (OL-1997), and daughter - Dolly.

I was telephonically informed of the sad news, by our classmate, V.T. Rajan (Sumeru-1970); after which I spoke to Elango's son.

Elango was affectionately known as "Kadalai" ("Peanut" in Tamil), owing to his then diminutive size. He was an outstanding gymnast and contortonist in School, and took an active part in all activities, and was an extremely popular and energetic character on campus.

The funeral will take place at Madurai around 2.00 p.m. or later, on Monday, 31st January 2011.

Elango's son, Villavan may be contacted at: villavan79@yahoo.com.
I am copying this mail to Joseph Thomas, President of the OLA Bangalore Chapter.

I would request others reading this, to please forward this email to Mr. Iyengar, and to Mr. Reddy (ex-LSL Teachers) in Madurai, as well as to other OLs in Madurai.

In Grief,

Jasbir S. Randhawa
(Aravalli-1970)
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Dear All,

It is sad ,terribly so when one you have known so well passes on.
I think Elango was there when I joined in 1964. A Live wire,to put it mildly. I was not part of his Inner Circle,he did not need one,everybody knew Elango,his voice gruff at most times,a great athlete,a great guy,
I have had the misfortune of losing Shobhana Damodaran,Ambarnath,Vinodh Nayar,Padmanabhan Menon,Sunil Raghavan,all in my class,except for Padhu(1 year senior to me, nevertheless a great friend),and Sunil,a year my junior who succumbed to the Big C,all in rather tragic circumstances.Why them ,Lord,what did they do to deserve this?
May they all rest in Peace,
An absolutely shocked mate,

A.K.Sreekumar-Vin-'72

Death,Be not proud.
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Dear Villa,

My deepest condolences and may god give you all the strength during these tough times.

Regards,
Thomas Mathew

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Dear OLs,
With profound sorrow, this is to inform you all that K.Elango, passed away this evening at Bangalore.
He is a cousin of J.Muruganantham ( Muruga ) of Coimbatore.
His son E.Villavan is also an OL.
M.S.P.Senthikumar.
President - OLA.
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Thank you all for remembering my father. It is good to know that he was in your thoughts.

It was very thoughtful and kind of you all to take the time to share your memories of my dad with me.

All your words were not only comforting, but a source of strength for my family and me in this difficult time.

Thank you,

Villavan.Elango
(OL-97)

Friday, January 28, 2011

Distinguished Lawrencians and Lawrencian Families



Padma awards for 11 from State


Ms. Chandy said, “I am delighted to be recognised with this honour. This is not only a personal recognition for me, but an acknowledgement of the entire team that helped create the Ashraya Neelbagh Residential School [for children of migrant labourers] and worked on our projects with underprivileged children.”

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Heartiest Congratulations to Nomita Chandy (Pankaj-1961) on being conferred the Padma Shree!

Nomita Chandy (nee Dev), as you all know is a Member of Lovedale's Board of Governors, and has at long last been recognized by the Govt. of India for her dedicated Social Work.

Nomita is the daughter of late Gen. Dev, of the Army Medical Corps, who was closely associated with our School. She is also the sister of Anjolie Ela Menon, and Rajika Horsburgh (1972), [w/o Michael Horsburgh (Nilgiri-1968)].

Warm regards,

Jasbir S. Randhawa
(Aravalli-1970)


Many thanks to Jamshed Batliwala (Sumeru-1962) for alerting me, all the way from the U.S. !
I have since seen the complete list of awardees at: http://currentaffairsappsc.blogspot.com/

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Wow. That is real neat - what an honor. Congratulations Ms. Nomita Chandy!

Ms. Chandy, I would just love to hear more about the nature of your interests/focus. [I'll admit, I'm pretty "into" such work, as it were.] I'm fairly certain google would spout out plenty of stuff, but there's just something about hearing it from the horse's mouth... ;)

Karishma "Cookie" Sushilkumar
Sum 05

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Hello Nomita

Hearty Congratulations on your being awarded a Padmashri !
We are indeed proud of our class mate and an OL of having received this award.
Looking forward to our meeting in May.
Love
Adil

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Karishma:


You can start here:


http://www.nriol.com/ashraya/


That is the website of the Ashraya Foundation which she is involved with. She has worked tirelessly for the underprivileged child & women for as long as I can remember. She used to be OLA President in the early 2000s ... Mathew Antony (who you know) was the VP at the time. And now she is on the Board of LSL. Other trivia: she is sister to famed painter Anjolie Ela Menon, both OLs in the late 50s, early 60s. She is mother to 2 OLs who were senior to me in school: Vidur Chandy and Shonali Chandy. Shonali was the headgirl of her batch (1985 or thereabouts).


Nomita: my congratulations to you. This honour is so well-deserved. You do all of us proud.


Yohaan.
Vin 91


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On behalf of ' class of 61 ' I congratulate Nomita on being awarded the Padma
Sree . A wonderful way to start our classes 50th Anniversary .

Partha Nil 61

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Hi,
Congratulations to Nomita on her being awarded Padma Sree.
Is she the first OL to get a Padma award?
Regards,
Job T T
Nil 60

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My wife's other sister Anjolie Ela Menon has already received this award. Just now waiting for the third sister - which by the way is the youngest and my wife raja to complete the hat rick - watch this space - mike horsburgh - batch 68 - and not eligible for this award - how sad !!!!

MICHAEL HORSBURGH
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Hi Michael,

How many awards do you want in your extended family ? Leave some for the other poor guys !!

Anil V - 69 batch
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COngrats, Nomita A well deserved honor.

Regrds
Jacob Chacko
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Hi Nomita:
We know you as the "Three Gems." Now whole of India acknowledges you as the "India's Gem."
With Best Wsihes,
Krish


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Dear Jasbir,

Just to inform my friends, that Usha was awarded the PADMA SHREE, BY THE GOVERNMENT OF INDIA.

Regards,

Janu Uthup
Aravalli-1962


Heartiest Congratulations to Usha Uthup on being awarded the Padma Shree!
This has been long overdue.

Most of you are no doubt aware that the evergreen/legendary singer and entertainer, Usha Uthup is the wife of Jani Chacko Uthup (Aravalli-1962), and the mother of OL Sunny Uthup.

Warm Regards,

Jasbir S. Randhawa
(Aravalli-1970)

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I'm thrilled beyond comprehension: Usha Uthup
IANS, Jan 26, 2011, 02.37pm IST

Singer Usha Uthup, who is one of the recipients of the Padma Shri, India's fourth highest civilian award, said she couldn't believe her ears when she heard the news.

"I was thrilled beyond comprehension when the news broke out. I couldn't believe it. This is so amazing and I'm so greatful to god. I'm also happy that my belief in the kind of music I wanted to make and in the fact that music gets hearts closer, paid off," Usha told us in an interview.

"I'm thankful to everyone for their support," she added.

The singer, who can effortlessly croon in 24 languages, was as it is enjoying her moment of glory with her recent song " Darling" from the film " 7 Khoon Maaf", which has become a chartbuster and now she has one more reason to celebrate.

"My first reaction was of sheer happiness when I heard about the award. I didn't know what to do. I was like a zombie for a few seconds," revealed the 63-year-old, who is also famous for her big border sarees, a trademark round bindi and her humungous collection of bangles.

Usha started her Bollywood career with " Hare Rama Hare Krishna", where she sang an English verse in "Dum maro dum". Then she sang several songs in the 1970s and 1980s for music directors R.D. Burman and Bappi Lahiri.

She is also known for songs like "Ek do cha cha cha" ("Shalimar"), "Koi yahan aha nache nache" (" Disco Dancer"), "Ramba ho" ("Armaan"), "Hari Om Hari" ("Pyaara Dushman") and "Doston se pyar kiya" ("Shaan") among others.

"I've been singing in 17 Indian languages and eight foreign languages with the only motive and understanding that music bonds people and I have seen that happening. I'm happy that I got an award for what I believe in," said Usha.

The singer can sing in Bengali, Hindi, Punjabi, Assamese, Oriya, Gujarati, Marathi, Konkani, Malayalam, Kannada, Tamil, Tulu and Telugu, English, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Sinhalese, Swahili, Russian, Nepalese, Arabic, Creole, Zulu, and Spanish among others.

On the whole, Usha is happy that her success will encourage more people to follow their hearts and make the kind of music they like.

"I think this award will give an impetus to the younger generation who want to pursue the music of their choice and will teach them to hang in there till the very end," she said.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Fore more on Usha Uthup, check out her website: http://www.ushauthup.com/


from Jasbir S. Randhawa
--------------------------------------------------



Hello Jani,
Kindly congratulate Usha on her being awarded the Padma Shree, from the OLA Fraternity.
M.S.P.Senthikumar.
President - OLA.

-------------------------------------
Jani

Please congratulate Usha for the award. I remember the 1st time I heard her in Trincas . Wow. Congrats again.

Regards
Jacob Chacko


---------------------------------------
Of course this is the same throaty awesome, Sunny Uthup's mom and Yanny Uthup's wife.
Cheers
Sudipt DuttaVin 77

------------------------

Congratulations to Usha Uthup (or Didi as we know her now in Kerala). Long time in coming though. Will never forget the way she took the last years Garden of Eden Party from its very amateurish mode of singing into the clouds with her powerful voice and knack of getting the audience involved. Congratulations once again.
Inasu Jacob
----------------------------------------------------------



Hi Philipose,

Heartiest Congratulations on the Nao Sena Medal (NM)!!
This is yet another feather in your cap! Keep up the good show.

How goes the course in the UK?

Warm Regards,

Jasbir

Thanks, Peter, for the breaking news!



440 Republic Day Gallantry and other Defence Decorations

The President has approved awards of 440 gallantry and other Defence decorations to Armed Forces personnel and others on the eve of the 62nd Republic Day Celebrations. This includes 05 Kirti Chakra, 21 Shaurya Chakra, 05 Bar to Sena Medal (Gallantry), 135 Sena Medal (Gallantry), 02 Nao Sena Medal (Gallantry), 03 Vayu Sena Medal (Gallantry), 28 Param Vishisht Seva Medal, 04 Uttam Yudh Seva Medal, 51 Ati Vishisht Seva Medal, 04 Yudh Seva Medal, 02 Bar to Sena Medal (Devotion to Duty), 38 Sena Medal (Devotion to Duty), 08 Nao Sena Medal (Devotion to Duty), 14 Vayu Sena Medal (Devotion to Duty), 02 Bar to Vishisht Seva Medal and 118 Vishisht Seva Medal.


In addition a total of five Mention-In-Despatches have also been announced for participating in Operation Rakshak.


On January 26, 2011 the President will confer the Ashok Chakra Award on Major Laishram Jyotin Singh (posthumous), announced earlier on Independence Day, August 15, 2010, before the start of the parade at the Rajpath.

-----------------------------------

Congratulations to Capt Phillipose on this honour.

Indra: I know we have some images of Capt Phillipose somewhere ... ??

anyway for now there are some images of him and also Team Brahmaputra
in this album below that was dedicated to his brother Simon George
Pynumootil ... Lt Simon George Pynumootil, Indian Navy who died in a
plane crash in May1985. Naval aviator. Aravali 1976

Most of the images are of Simon, but there are some with both of them:

http://picasaweb.google.com/oldlaws/MemoriesOfSimonGeorgePynumootil23July195917May1985#

His email is: Philipose Pynumootil

He is a subscribed member of the Oldlaws Forum.

yohaan
vin 91

------------------------------------------------

To: Jasbir S. Randhawa
Sent: Wednesday, January 26, 2011 03:48
Subject: Re: NAO SENA MEDAL (DEVOTION TO DUTY) - CAPTAIN PHILIPOSE GEORGE PYNUMOOTIL (02973-F)


Dear Sir ,

THANK YOU very much for your good wishes. It is really nice of you to keep track of literally everything in spite of your busy schedule

Regards

Philipose
-------------------------------------------------

Dear Philipose,
CONGRATS
T T Job
Nil 60


-----------------------------
Wonderful day for Lawrence School Lovedale.

Am sure all Old Henry Lawrence and all teachers will be proud of this day.

Congratulations to Nomita , Phillipose on this great honour and to USha Uthup too - a strong OL connection.

Way to go.

Best wishes and regards
Sincerely,

Ramesh Venkateswaran
--------------------------------------

Congratulations Capt.Philipose on being awarded the Nau Sena Medal.
One more occasion for us OLs to be proud of.
Keep our School Flag Flying high.
M.S.P.Senthikumar.
President - OLA
.
--------------------------------------------
child" (navy) myself, I am especially appreciative of your past service. Congratulations on your award, Captain!

Karishma Sushilkumar
Sum 05



On Wed, Jan 26, 2011 at 5:56 AM, Philipose Pynumootil wrote:


Dear Cmde Sarin , Yohaan , Jasbir

THANKS A MILLION for the good wishes and for posting this on the group . Have got a million calls !! And am 'loving it ' ... like the Mcdonalds advt.

Am privileged to share space with Mrs Nomita Chandy and Mrs Usha Uthup .. albeit for a humbler honour !

London is great ... am diligently 'minding the gap between the train and the platform'
Met up with lots of Old and OOOOLD Laws at my classmate CAAbraham's place.
Chetan Popat (Head Boy 1972) , Vinay Vyas , Ki Joseph (Both 1981) , Ashok Pillai ('82), Divya Britto ('89?)

Regards,
Philipose


PHILIPOSE G PYNUMOOTIL


----------------------------------------------
Hi Captain:
Congrats to you once again.
Wishing your family and you the very BEST.
Thanks,
Krish

Thursday, January 27, 2011

LOVEDALE RATNA -- Mr. C. Mukerji -- RIP







VERY SADLY,OUR MR.C.MUKHERJEE PASSED AWAY ON 20TH JANUARY.
REGARDS.

JANI UTHUP-ARAVALLI-1962

-----------------------------------------

DEAR KRISH,
I'M COPYING THE LETTER I RECD
FROM USHA,MR.MUKHERJI'S DAUGHTER.

DEAR JANI,
I HV FINALLY SUCCEEDED IN WRITING ABOUT DADDY-I WONDER IF THIS IS WHAT U WANTED.I'M ENCLOSING A FEW PHOTOS OF HIS,IN CASE U WUD LIKE TO HV THEM,FOR THE ARTICLE.HIS LATEST ONE,TAKEN BY MY DAUGHTER-I'LL E-MAIL TO U.
THERE ARE TWO IMPORTANT FACTS,I HV NOT ADDED,BECAUSE,I WONDERED WHETHER U NEEDED THESE DETAILS.
1-HAD A HEART ATTACK IN 1991-RECOVERED.
2-HAD A PARALYTIC STROKE IN 2003-WHOLE RIGHT SIDE WAS PARALYSED,SPEECH LOST,BUT WITH PHYSIOTHERAPY AND HIS WILL POWER,STARTED TALKING,YHOUGH SPEECH WAS SLURRED,AND WAS ABLE TO MOVE ABT INSIDE THE HOUSE.NEVER USED SPECS,HEARING AID OR A WALKING STICK,TILL THE VERY END.ENJOYED TENNIS MATCHES,CRICKET MATCHES,AND THE BIG FIGHT ON TV.
MY PARENTS GOT A VERY BIG BLOW,WHEN I LOST MY HUSBAND-DILIP CHATTERJEE IN 2002,AND THE 2ND SHOCK,WAS WHEN MY ELDER SISTER NOMITA,LOST HER HUSBAND IN 2006.
DO LET ME KNOW IF ALL THE DETAILS ARE AS U WANTED.
WITH WARM PERSONAL REGARDS,
Y/S,
USHA.

-----------------------------------

From Jani

A MANY SPLENDOURED PERSON-THAT IS HOW U WUD REFFER TO LATE CHITTRANJAN MUKHERJI-KNOWN AS MUKUL TO HIS FRIENDS,AND POPULARILY KNOWN AS 'BULL MUKAJ'LOVINGLY BY HIS STUDENTS.
C.M.WAS BORN ON 05-11-1921,AT BANDA-UP,AND BREATHD HIS LAST ON 21-01-2011,AT A PRIVATE HOSPITAL IN ALLAHABAD,AGED 89.HE GOT MARRIED TO MEERA CHATTERJEE,IN 1947,AND WAS BLESSED WITH TWO DAUGHTERS-NOMITA AND USHA,AND LIVED TO SEE HIS GRAND AND GREAT GRAND CHILDREN.
HE HAD HIS SCHOOL/COLLEGE EDUCATION IN JHANSI AND ACCQUIRED A DIPPLOMA IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION FROM GOVERNMENT COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION-ALLAHABAD.
TEACHING WAS HIS PASSION,AND 1ST LOVE,BUT HE HAD OTHER INTERESTS AS WELL.HE PARTICIPATED IN PLAYS,WHICH WERE BROADCAST ON ALL INDIA RADIO.HE LOVED TO SING-HIS FAVOURITE SINGERS WERE K.L.SAIGAL,AND C.H.ATMA.HE LOVED GARDENING,AND SPEND HIS SPARE TIME WORKING IN THE VEG PATCH,INVOLVING HIS STUDENTS AS WELL.HE LOVED FLOWERS,AND HIS BEAUTIFUL ROSE GARDEN BROUGHT HIM A LOT OF PRAISE,AND EVEN WON PRIZES AT THE ANNUAL FLOWER SHOW AT OOTY.HE WAS A EXCELLENT SPORTSMAN,AND WAS GOOD IN ATHLETICS,AND ENJOYED PLAYING TENNIS.

HIS TEACHING CAREER STARTED IN 1951,IN L.S.SANAWAR,BUT IN A YEARS TIME,HIS SERVICES WERE REQUIRED BY MR.K.I.THOMAS,THE PRINCIPAL AT L.S.L.HE REMAINED AT LSL,TILL HE RETIRED IN 1982.MR.C.M,WAS NOT ONLY A GOOD TEACHER,BUT INVOLVED WITH NUMEROUS ACTIVITIES OF THE SCHOOL.HE FOUNDED THE NCC AIR WING AT SCHOOL.
IT IS SAD INDEED WHEN U LEARN ABOUT THE PASSING AWAY OF ONE OF THE PILLARS OF THE SCHOOL.HE HAD A BLEND OF COMPASSION AND STERNESS,WHICH MADE HIM A SUCCESSFUL TEACHER,HOUSE MASTER AND MASTER-IN-CHARGE.HE COULD GET THE BEST OUT OF A PERSON,BE IT STUDIES,SPORTS,DEBATES,OUTINGS OR ACTUALLY ANYTHING.HE HAD A MAGNETIC PERSONALITY,WITH A PASSION FOR THE OUT DOORS.HE ALSO LOVED GOOD FOOD,AND WAD AN EXCELLENT COOK.HE TRANSFORMED ARAVALLI HOUSE AND HIS STUDENTS TO GREAT HEIGHTS,BE IT ACADEMICS,SPORTS OR ANY OUT DOOR ACTIVITIES.
HE KINDLED THE SPIRIT OF ADVENTURE WITHIN MANY OF HIS STUDENTS.HE TOOK THE STUDENTS ON TREKS,OUTWARD BOUND CAMPS,BOATING,PICNICS ETC,TO PLACES IN AND AROUND LOVEDALE.MANY OF HIS STUDENTS MAY RECALL THE BI-CYCLE TRIPS TO MYSORE/COIMBATOREND,AND THE MANY CARD SESSIONS,THEY HAD IN HIS HOUSE AFTER 'LIGHTS-OUT',AND THE STORIES ABOUT HIS EXPLOITS,IN THE 2ND WORLD WAR!!.

'BULL MUKAJ'MADE A LASTING IMPRESSION ON THE WHOLE SCHOOL.HIS MEMORY WILL LIVE ON IN THE MINDS OF SO MANY,WHO CAME IN CONTACT WITH HIM AND WHOSE CHARACTERS HE MOULDED.
MAY HE R.I.P.

Jani Uthup.
------------------------------------------


Dear Friends,

If this is regarding my uncle, Mr. C. Mukerji, it is true. He passed away in a hospital in Allahabad. He had been ailing for a few years, but his last few days were peaceful. He had his entire family (my dad and mother i.e. Mr. and Mrs M. Mukerji, his wife, daughters and grand kids by his side).
Fondly known as "Bull Mukaj", he had a magnetic personality with a passion for the great outdoors. I am sure he kindled the spirit of adventure within many of his students as he did for me.
Amongst other things, he had a rare blend of compassion and sternness which made him a successful Teacher, House-master and Master-in-charge in a way that was quite unique amongst his peers. And, he always walked the talk.
I for one, will also remember him for being great at small things which ultimately matter a good deal in life.
Warm regards,
Shomir

----------------------------

The flood of mail on the death of C Mukaj has reminded me of what a wondeful housemaster we had in Aravilli house in the years I was there (1956 to 1961). Old C Mukaj was a real character in every way. In 1957 or 1958 old Bull got this brilliant idea of getting the use of a field near Aravalli house for potatoe cultivation. We were all roped in for the actual digging and planting. With the profit made from the sale of the potatoes 6 cycles were purchased for our house. I remember the thrill of learning to cycle and of the cycling trips we made on the Mysore road. We were much envied by the other houses who had to pay extra to hire our bikes. Another memory is of a camp he took us to somewhere on the Downs, probably near Emrald. Someone had a fly fishing rod and we caught and ate rainbow trout. The memory of eating fresh trout fried in butter and with nothing but a little salt is making my mouth water at this very moment. On a recent trip to the Nilgiris in 2009 I actually managed to catch a couple of rainbow trout (am keeping the exact location secret) and to cook and eat it just the same way.

J.Vellapally (1953 to 1961 Arv)


-----------------------------

Hello Jasbir,

Sorry to hear the demise of Mr.C.Mukherjee.

I remember those days when we were in Kailash House ( exclusively for the 5th Class boys ), we all wanted to go to Aravalli House since those days Aravalli House under Mr.C.Mukherjee was the best house in sports.
And when it came to outward bound camps, we all wanted to go with Mr.C.Mukherjee; since he gave the best food.

Jasbir, could you give me the contact email id of the closest family member of Mr.C.Mukherjee. So that I can send them a condolence mail on behalf of the ola.

Thanking you.

Senthi.
------------------------------

Shomir

My condolences to you and the entire Mukherjee clan. Please give my condolences to the family of your uncle and also to your Mom and Dad.

For the rest of the OLs, I'd like to share two stories about BULL Mukaj.

The first is from about 1955 or 1956 - I was a toddler in Prep School. One day, BULL Mukaj (we little tots didn't call him that but knew it was a name used by the big boys) came to the Prep School and was talking with a bunch of us. He asked me if I knew how to skate and I said no. He said, "Come with me, I'll teach you." So he took me to the Senior School and got a pair of roller skates strapped on me and got me skating. He did it one more time.

A random act of kindness. My other memory of the skating rink is watching Adi Pandole skate around - he was good.

The second story is from much later. I was in Vindhya House and I'd venture to say this was in 1961 or 1962. For some reason, BULL got ticked off at Lalu Talreja (who died very shortly after we graduated in 1963 under sad circumstances) and me. I have no recall of what our transgression was, but as such things go, it was a minor offense (nothing rising to the level of jump starting Anjolie Menon's Fiat! - for KJwalla's edification).

Anyhow, he decided to give us a "skinning" so he ordered us to run to the dorm and change out of battle dress into our PT clothes. We did this and figured that he was going to have us run or do calisthenics or whatever, but when we got back to the dining room quad as we had been ordered to, he shouted: "Now run back and change into your battle dress and come back."

When we got to the dorm, we were in no rush. But BULL came huffing and puffing behind us and told us to hurry up.

He did this a couple more times and I recall that I protested. He raised his hand like he was going to slap me but then started laughing for some reason and told us not to do whatever we had done again.

I had the pleasure of meeting Mr. and Mrs. M. Mukherjee in New Haven, Connecticut some years ago. Mrs. Mukherjee cooked a Bengali fish specialty which was sumptious. I heard from Mr. M. Mukherjee about a year ago. Shomir please send me his phone number at bwana@madans.com.

Anyhow, Mr. C. Mukherjee - a great teacher. I know the Aravalli guys loved him.

The random act of kindness - I have often relived that day when as an eight or nine year-old, I got on skates for the first time.

And the wheels of time have rolled on since then, making new memories with each step.

Cheerz BULL ... thanks for the skating lesson,

Bwana

---------------------
Dear all,

Herewith mail from Narayan Adige informing us of the passing away of Mr C Mukerji after a long illness, cheerfully borne.

Mr C Mukerji joined Lawrence School, Lovedale in May 1952 as the Hindi master and House Master, Aravalli House. In 1954 he

founded the NCC Air Wing at Lovedale. He took us to NCC camps at Lucknow, Pallavaram (Chennai) and other places.

Mr C Mukerji transformed Aravalli House with his interest and ability in sports, outdoor activities and academics. While he was a

strict disciplinarian, we Aravallians loved him because he was more than an academic. He took us on treks to Reservoir, Big Hill,

Cairn Hill, Marlimund Lake, Mukurti, cycle rides to Pykara (I got lost and landed up in Singara power house instead) and monthly

boating & picnic lunch at Ooty lake. He even arranged a joy ride in a Tiger Moth at Coimbatore for a few of the NCC Air Wing cadets.

Many were the card sessions we had in Mr C Mukerji's house after lights out. These sessions were embellished with yarns about his

exploits in the Second World War. Above all, he left the running of Aravalli House to the prefects and monitors, thus giving us

valuable experience in running the show. No wonder everybody was jealous of Aravalli House, not least the other house masters.

One of them even built a wall across the corridor and the common toilet to separate us from his boys. [We used to climb over the

wall till he raised the wall right upto the roof.]

In the 1960s Mr C Mukerji was promoted and moved to Prep School as Senior Master. He continued his great work there and I'll

leave it to the students of that period to write more details.

Our deepest condolences to Mrs Mukerji, daughters Usha and Nomita and their families.

"Fortiter in Re"

In grief,

Joseph Thomas

Aravalli 1952-57

-------------------------------------------------------------------------
I just spoke to Usha, Mr. C Mukherjee's daughter. She stays in Allahabad while another is in Ghaziabad.

Fortunately Mr. M Mukherjee who is mostly in the US and may move there now that he has a Green card had just returned from

America on 31st Dec. and was therefore on hand to help when Mr. C Mukherjee 'suddenly' (as Usha said) passed away on 20th

January. He was 90.

Arun Bewoor
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Karishma, when my batch (OL91) joined school in 1982, Bull Mukker (Mr
C Mukerji) was Prep School Headmaster and also Hindi teacher. After
about a year, he retired and then his brother Mr M Mukerji (also
sometimes called Cow Mukker, but we just knew him as Mukker) became HM
of Prep School ... he taught Hindi too but was an all-roundsman ... he
was an excellent sportsman .. he joined us on the hockeyfield and
cricket and athletics ... he was a very powerful shot-putter and
discuss thrower. --> Now that's the younger brother I am talking
about ... After he retired from school, he started a Lawrence
preparatory school with his wife (also an LSL hindi teacher) in the
Lovedale area ... and so you must have known about him at that time.

Those were the two Mukerji brothers who have been an institution at
LSL for decades and decades ... I only got to know Bull Mukker for 1
year or so before he retired and then left school.

It is he who has passed away.

My condolences to the entire family.

Regards,

Yohaan
Vin 91

--------------------------------------------------------------------
So sorry to hear of the passing of Mr.C Mukherjee.
I have many fond memories of 'Bull Muchaj' as we used to call him.
The bicycle trips to Coimbatore and Mysore will always be in my mind.
He got me to go 'down the cud' climb a jack fruit tree, cut the jack fruit,
lug it up the hill (covered in the sap) .. all of this in the light of a flash light that he shone for me.I put it on my bike as I pushed the

bike up the mountains on the way back from Mysore. His wife made some pickle and gave us some.
He was very gracious when I hit a tree with my 'catty' (they were considered illegal)
the stone bounced off the tree and hit Muchaj on the back of his head. He turned around,
looked at me,rubbed his head and kept walking.
Yes, I have other fond memories.
My condolances to his family.

Sydney Reynolds
Vindhya '59
----------------------------------------------------
Sad to hear that Mr C Mukerji is no more.Besides being our Hindi teacher he was
also a wonderful story teller and we class 4 kids used to listen to him
spellbound.Her's one of his stories, about the shikari and his dog
".....spotting the deer the shikari fired and the bullet and the dog took
off....some times the dog was in front of the bullet and sometimes the deer
was behind the bullet,finally the dog caught hold of the deer and placed it in
front of the bullet...."!!His hind classes invariably ended on some interesting
topics like ICBMS etc. yes 'and the wall across the corridor' was for the
explicit purpose of protecting the cultured boys of Nilgiri house from the
hordes ! Goodbye Mukkaj 'aaraam 'n peace...

.Partha Nil 61

------------------------------------------------
It indeed is a sad day when you learn about the passing on of one of the pillars of Lovedale.Such a Man was Chittaranjan Mukerjee.I

joined in '64 in Class Three.
Memories abound,treks up Big Hill.walks to Lover's Rock... ...
Bull and his charming wife used to stay where the present Master in charge of Prep School.I never knew he had children.
Well,it was May,1964.Word just came through that Nehru passed away.Ma Enos,whose wards we were,in her patriotic fervour

ordered us to sit right where we were, (Most of us on Girl's School banks ) asking us to contemplate "Chacha's" life and mourn his

passing.
Suddenly,down the road from Prep strides an imposing figure,gurkha cap,black pullover et al bellowing "Boys,How about a walk to

the station?".Well,before he could complete that sentence,90 % of us(save some goody goodies) were with him.All went well till we

returned.Ma Enos (not unlike Miss Courtney of "Mind Your Language") greeted us and asked us to plonk ourselves where we

were.Morever,we were forbidden our month's Ooty outing to see the movie,"Dosti" at Assembly Rooms.
End result-we sit it out in school,Bull and Ma Bull along with the goody goodies hop on to the Bedford Bus for Ooty.
Lots could be written about this Man,sometimes our age,sometime KIT's, sometimes "The Raging Bull' in Hindi class(he could sure

pack a wallop!
May He rest(walk,trek) in Peace and tickle a few "Miss Courtneys" up there.
Fare thee well,

A.K.Sreekumar
VIN-'64-'72.

-------------------------------------
very sorry to hear that C mukhaj ( affectionately known as ' 'bull' mukhaj) passed away.He was my housemaster in aravalli house

from 58 to 63. An enthusiastic footballer and a great housemaster, he was the sort of corner stone a sucessful boarding school was

built on. we were fortunate to have a great group at that time, mukhaj, Mac, Hari and Iyengar. He later became the " headmistress" of

the Prep School !
I understand that he was not well for some time.
His memory will live on in the minds of so many young boys whose characters he moulded. RIP

dr salim thomas ( ara63)
-------------------------------------------------

Dear All,
Sorry to hear about the sad demise of Mr. C.Mukherji, affectionately nicknamed as "Bull-Mukhaj".He was our house master and

hindi teacher. His card sessions were unique and his yarns were memorable.He was an able administrator, and organised the Air

Wing of the NCC.We can never forget the NCC Camp at Lucnow.
He had his own 'spud-fields' behind the Aravalli house, and we all helped him out with the cultivation. Ofcourse, we also used to

raid them later!
(If I remember correctly,he did not believe in God.)
My sincere and deep condolences to his family members.

K.V.
(Dr.KV Venugopal, Aravalli 1955)

----------------------------------------------------

I'm sorry to hear about demise of C Mukherjee. Please convey my condolences to the family

Regards
Jacob CHacko('64)

-------------------------------------

It is with deep sorrow that I read about the passing away of Mr C Mukherjee. I remember him as a humorous jolly man who taught

us Hindi and made it interesting with his personal anecdotes. He was in charge of the Mumbai school party and we had a lot of

good trips with him, when we went home or returned back to school since he made it fun so that we would not feel homesick.
Even when he wanted to scold us if we were naughty, his method was always with a touch of humour. Just the other day I related to

some friends how Mr C Mukherjee taught us and his jokes.
My sincere condolences to his family and may God give them the strength to bear this loss and may his Soul Rest in Peace

Meher Castelino (Mistry)
Pankarj 1960
---------------------------------
My heartfelt condolences to the family of Mr C. Mukerji on his demise. May he rest in peace.
He joined School in 1954 as a Hindi teacher and was Aravalli Housemaster. During his tenure, Aravalli was the top house; winners

of the Board of Administration Shield for best all-round House, Defence Services Cup for Games and Sports.
He was the first Housemaster to introduce a House motto - "Fortiter in Re" - Resolute in Action; a house flag and House Honours

Boards.
He commanded the NCC Army Wing.
I had the honour of being Aravalli House Captain in 1956. High achievers were Joseph Thomas, Veer Sagar, Arun Bewoor and later,

Jani Uthup, Salim Thomas and TT Job

I recall his brother Mohan joined later in 1955 or 1956.

Both brothers were excellent sportsmen and coaches

Kevin Phillips.
Aravalli 1948 - 1956

-------------------------------------------------------
pl convey my heartfelt condolence to the family.

VT Rajan
(Sumeru-1970)
----------------------------------

Wingco and Senthi,

The younger brother is M. Mukerji aka "Trout Mukhaj", not S. Mukerji as mentioned by you. The older was C. Mukerji aka "Bull

Mukhaj".
Trout is the younger and taller one who had a pre-school just beyond Lovedale station.
Both brothers were legends in their time, both inculcated a spirit of adventure and a love of nature in their students, and were

extremely popular.

Mr. M. Mukerji's older son, Cdr. Shomir Mukerji (I.N. Retd) was OL Class of 1971, now settled in the U.S. He's an ex-Indian Navy Diver

and was/is in the Guiness Book of World Records, as the world record holder for "the certified deepest dive at the highest altitude",

which took place in the icy waters of Ladakh.

Warm regards,

Jasbir S. Randhawa
(Aravalli-1970)

-------------------------------------------
My condolences to Usha and his family. He was a real 'Bull' in all ways - in size, in character and heart. He gave me first chance in

athletics in 1961 by putting me in a 200m race with kids much older that was unwinnable. I came in second and never looked back -

ending up as School Athletic Captain in 1965. He encouraged me all the way and pushed me and got on my case when I slacked off.

My Hindi was so bad that even he could not help me, even though he did try.
Another highlight were a couple of camps I got to go with him in the younger years.
He was a great person and made a great impression on me.


Firdaus [Fadla]
Vin 65

----------------------------------------------

Shomir,

My condolences to your uncle's family and your parents. "Bull Mukaj" made a lasting impression on the whole school, that's for

sure--I think it was an extraordinary ability to connect to one and all with great ease.
I was in school 1954-61 and he taught me Hindi for 3 or 4 years at least. I think he knew how challenged I was in any kind of

physical activity and so advised me on
academics, careers and so on. He was a passionate teacher and I still remember his rendering of "Aurangzeb ki Akhiri Raat".
May his soul rest in peace

GSubs
Nilgiri 1961
----------------------------------------
Hello Friends,
Just a few lines to add to the many emails of fond memories of Mukaj.
Yes, he transformed Aravalli house into a sports/athletics powerhouse! And as a contributor to sports achievements during our

days in Aravalli, there is one classic instance of the skills he possessed in strategy which is worth mentioning. You will all recall the

famous 24x100 relay event which used to be the penultimate event in the annual inter-house sports. Well, in my final year, he came

up to me and said, " Ramakrishna, I will require you to run the 1st leg of this important race instead of the last leg as you are the

fastest runner in school, and I want you to lap the other runners in the first leg by at least by 2 laps!" I was astounded by this

suggestion, whereupon he mentioned in confidence that we were going to to adopt the totally unusual, untraditional strategy of

sending in the bigger faster boys first to finish up with the little guys completing the race for us! So, there I was, lined up at the start

with the smallest boys from other houses, and we did carry out this to the utter shock of all other houses, as this was kept a well

guarded secret till the commencement of the race. Well, for those of you who remember, we did win the race will the big fast brutes

from other houses huffing, puffing and bearing down on or little guys from our house who however hung on to the formidable lead to

breast the tape!!!!! And you will recollect that the 24x100 qualified for the largest number of points for any event!
With fond memories,

Ram Adige
(Aravalli 1955-1961
)

---------------------------------------------
Hi,

Bull Mukarj was an institution within an institution.

I joined school in 1956 and Bull was my Hindi teacher. Coming from a Chennai school, I knew very little Hindi. I could not get on

with the idea that objects could have gender. My home work in Hindi was shoddy & he started calling me "Scrounge"r. Luckily it

lasted only for a year. I had taken interest in aero modelling from my first year in school. The big boys used to build the models and

we youngsters just got to help them. They were very good at building the frame and the wings, but were not too keen on the messey

job of papering the structure. It was left to lesser mortals like us. In my first year, I became an expert in papering planes with out

wrinkles.

In Dec 1956, there was an NCC Airwing camp at Pallavaram in Chennai. Bull was the NCC officer. He wanted Lovedale to get the aero

modelling trophy at the camp. The aeromodelling instructor, "Helicopter" Raj insisted that I had to be taken along for papering. I

was only 12 years old & minimum age for NCC was 14. Bull did manage to bend the rules a bit to take me along. At Pallavaram, there

was a tent given to each shcool for aero modelling. I was asked to be inside that tent from dusk to dawn so that a little kid is not

seen by other NCC officers. The senior guys used to bring breakfast & lunch to the tent. This was probably the only time in the history

of LSL were the seniors served a junior. Since I had nothing else to do other than papering, I got permission from the aeromodelling

instructor to build a plane by myself and that was the first plane I built. The school did get the trophy. Since then, I became his blue

eyed boy.

At the end of 1959, a batch of students were sent on a tour of Karnataka & Maharashtra under Bull. I was also a part of that group.

His thrifty way of handling money ensured that we saw the maximum number of places within the allotted money. Comfort was not a

part of the tour. Most of Karnataka state was toured in a rattle trap of a minibus that had seen service during World War II.

However, we covered every nook and corner.

At Jog falls, we went to the bottom of the waterfall to have a bath. He produced one life buoy soap & cut it into 20 cubes and gave

one to each one of us. His philosophy was that no one ever came back with a soap from the bottom of Jogfalls because of the force

of water. Why waste full soaps?

We started our train journey towards Maharashtra from Arisikare station at night. Dinner was bread and boiled eggs (Boiled in a

large tin on the deserted platform)

The present Top flats of Lovedale, which is the envy of other schools in the hills, was expanded under his supervision. Till 1959.

Topflats was small & could house only one hockey ground. MRC agreed to give a bulldozer to the school. Fuel had to be put by the

school. The initial plan was to make topflats one and a half times the old size. The supervision of the task was given to Bull by KIT.

Finally, when top flats took shape at the end of 1960, it was 3 times the old size thanks to Bull. It is worthwhile putting up his name

at Top Flats with description of work he did in making a large parade/ play ground.

The last time I met him was when I in IAF & I was going from Coimbatore to Delhi.The school children were also on the same train

under the charge of Bull. He was very happy to see me & we chatted late into night.

A legend has come to the end. May his soul rest in peace.

Regards,
T T Job
Nil 60

----------------------------------------------
Bull used to take us in Prep School on after dinner night rambles to Big Hill. Later this was the training that we graduated to

Captains and Kites in Junior School and to Kempey Gowda talkies in senior school.
I also remember him taking us to the reservoir area in daylight this time to show us Leopard pug marks in the wet mud. Leopards

used to come up to the area in peak summer. Another time he took us on outward bound to Mudumalai in a truck given by Dinesh

Madappa's dad. Bull was an environmentalist but a nasty potato farmer too!
I also accompanied him during a vacation from Cochin to Idduki where Joy Sengupta (73 or 74 batch) and Jayshree (left early) lived.

There werent so many Bongs in Kerala then and there was a single DUrga Puja in all Kerala. Joy's father was building the dam at the

time.

Cheers

Sudipt Dutta
Vin 77
---------------------------------------
My sincere condolences to Mr Mukerji's family. He taught us Hindi when we were in Prep School when he was the Headmaster

of Prep School. It was Mr Mukerji who explained the words of the school song 'Sabse sundar, jag se pyaara' to us.

May his soul rest in eternal peace.

Malini née Menon
Pankaj 1972

------------------------------------

To All Bull Mukaj Shishyas,
House master / Warden, think of these words and I can only visualize "Mukaj".Through college and my childrens schooling , it was comparing Mukaj with all the rest. A discilpinarian but at the same time full of warmth , he could get the BEST out of a person, be it in studies , sports, debates,outings and anything.
Yes, Ram, you described him with just that one ' relay . episode '-- The man always had his THINKING CAP on which took Aravallians way ahead of the others.Our condolences to the family. WOH JAB YAAD AAYE, BOHUTH YAAD AAYE.

Sashi Nambiar (Ar 65 )
-----------------------------------------------------
By the time we joined prep school in ‘70, bull was probably past his prime but still a potent force to reckon with, as prep school in-charge. He was feared for both, his temper slaps as well as his subject -- everybody’s bugbear, Hindi. His hockey flair had been reduced to narrating tales, showing old news clippings and having students over at his place to hear the world cup commentary on his radio. The opening lines of the poem ‘ma’ at the start of class 4, have gone down into the annals of OL literary history (if there is such a genre).

His paan box, from which his wife provided his endless fix should go down into the OL museum of artefacts along with his hat & walking stick. An unusual thing about him (which got a lot of folks riled) was his subjective evaluation throughout the year, based on class performance, instead of exams. That and his handwriting - I had a tough time convincing my family that his scribble in my report card said, “good student,” not “poor student.”

The two brothers couldn’t have been more different; in fact, one rarely saw them together. It’s sad when people like him, B L Singh and others leave school to go back to their hometown up north, never to be seen or heard of again.

DINYAR DASTOOR
ARA '79



------------------------------------------------

Dear Sir, You will always be remembered!!!

Saturday, January 22, 2011

Memories of School Life by Joseph Cheri Mathew





Dear Alums,

Here are a few verses I put together to capture my memories of school.
I posted these on the forum for my batch and my batch-mates seemed to
like them; I hope you will too.

Best,

Joseph Cheri Mathew
Vindhya '85

Memories of School Life
------------------------------

Cool and crisp, the mornings and nights
Warm the lawns when sunny and bright
Eucalyptus - in our senses
Hills and streams for adventures

Grand old buildings reach back in time
Remember those before their prime
Here played and grew and learned the norms
That even now some still perform

Songs of worship stay on my mind
As the teacher unusually kind
And unexpected treats at night
Debates, concerts, plays and fights

When the lights were out, we plotted and planned
And whispered stories - some foolish, some grand
And in the morning, we rose to a life
Full of competition, full of strife

Such was our school life, rich in experience
Memories still retain their brilliance
Remind me how I grew up with and met
A hundred others I cannot forget
--------------------------------------

Thanks Joseph. Wish your family and you the very BEST!!!